The urbex life

These floodlit sites providing me some great no-stress lighting here.

Urbexing isn’t just about breaking into buildings because it’s illegal and therefore vaguely rebellious and cool. There’s something more anarchist and politically rebellious about noticing the beauty within these abandoned spaces. 

To view the cohesive deadpan symmetry of scaffolding or the speckled and peeling wallpaper of an ageing church with appreciation rejects a status quo that would have us believe that spaces without primp and polish, unrefined spaces are worthless. It allows one to place value in the traditionally valueless. Thus, the crumbling cathedrals, half demolished warehouses, the derelict, deserted town houses all regain a sense of worth beyond the traditional or their original purpose. 
Some of the things that I like most about urbexing are the little details that add human touch: half the carving decoration on a staircase, the ornaments left at the altar of a boarded up church. 
Other times, it is the wilderness poking its little head out that most appeals. I love how buddleahs seem capable of growing anywhere, even through solid concrete. Watching the emergence of plants and flowers and moss is really special. It reminds me that, no matter how hard we try to create these spaces of metal and tarmac, free from nature, the wilderness will always creep back in and regain control. It’s cheesy, but I find it really calming and strangely beautiful to witness. 

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